Cloud Praxis #4 : Syncing our Dir to Office 365

praxis4dirsync
The Apollo-Soyuz metaphor is too rich to resist. With apologies to NASA, astronauts & cosmonauts everywhere

Right. So if you’ve been following me through Cloud Praxis #1-3 and took my advice, you now have a simple Active Directory lab on your premises (Wherever that may be) and perhaps you did the right thing and purchased a domain name, then bought an Office 365 Enterprise E1 subscription for yourself. Because reading about contoso.com isn’t enough.

What am I talking about “if”. I know you did just what I recommended you do. I know because you’re with me here, working through the Cloud Praxis Program because you, like me, are an IT Infrastructurist who likes to win! You are a fellow seeker of #InfrastructureGlory, and you will pursue that ideal wherever it is, on-prem, hybrid, in the cloud, buried in a signed cmdlet, on your hybrid iSCSI array or deep inside an NVGRE-encapsulated packet, somewhere up in the Overlay.

Right. Right?

Someone tell me I’m not alone here.

You get there through this thing.
You get there through this thing.

So DirSync. Or Directory Synchronization. In the grand Microsoft tradition of product names, DirSync has about the least sexy name possible. Imagine yourself as a poor Microsoft technology reseller; you’ve just done the elevator pitch for the Glories that are to be had in Office 365 Enterprise & Azure, and your mark is interested and so he asks:

Mark: “How do I get there?”

Sales guy: “DirSync”

Mark: “Pardon me?”

Sales Guy: “DirSync.”

Mark: Are you ok? Your voice is spasming or something. Is there someone I can call?

DirSync has been around for a long, long time. I hadn’t even heard of it or considered the possibility of using it until 2012 or 2013, but while prepping the Daisetta Lab, I realized this goes back to 2008 & Microsoft Online Services.

But today, in 2014, it’s officially called Windows Azure Active Directory Sync, and though I can’t wait to GifCam you some cool powershell cmdlets that show it in action, we’ve got some prep work to do first.

Lab Prep for DirSync

As I said in Cloud Praxis #3, to really simulate your workplace, I recommend you build your on prem lab AD with a fully-routable domain name, then purchase that same name from a registrar on the internet. I said in Cloud Praxis #2 that you should have a lab computer with 16GB of RAM and you should expect to build at least two or three VMs using Client Hyper-V at the minimum.

Now’s the time to firm this all up, prep our lab. I know you’re itching to get deep into some O365, but hang on and do your due dilligence, just like you would at work.

  • Lab DHCP : What do you have as your DHCP server? If it’s a consumer-level wifi router that won’t let you assign an FQDN to your devices, consider ditching it for DHCP and stand-up a DHCP instance in your Lab Domain Controller. Your wife will never know the difference and you can ensure 1) that your VMs (whether 1 or 2 or several) get the proper FQDN suffix assigned, and 2) you can disable NetBIOS via MS DHCP
  • Get your on-prem DNS in order: This is the time to really focus on your lab DNS. I want you to test everything; make some A-records, ensure your PTRs are created automatically. Create some C-Names and test forwarding. Download a tool like Steve Gibson’s DNS Benchmark to see which public name servers are the closest to you and answer the quickest. For me, it’s Level 3. Set your forwarders appropriately. Enable logging & automatic testing
  • Build a second DC: Not strictly required, but best practice & wisdom dictates you do this ahead of DirSync. Do what I did; go with a Windows core VM for your second DC. That VM will only need 768mb of ram or so, and a 15GB .vhdx. But with it, you will have a healthier domain on-prem

Now over to O365 Enterprise portal. Read the official O365 Induction Process as I did, then take a look at the steps/suggestions below. I went through this in April; it’s easy, but the official guides leave out some color.

Office 365 Prep & Domain Port ahead of DirSync

  • Go to your registrar and assign and verify to Microsoft you own the domain via TXT record: Process here
  • Pick from the following options for DNS and read this:
    • Easy but not realistic: Just handover DNS to O365. I took the easy way admittedly. Daisetta Labs.net DNS is hosted by O365. It’s decent as DNS hosting goes, but I wouldn’t have chosen this option for my workplace as I use an Anycast DNS service that has fast CDN Propagation globally
    • More realistic: Create the required A Records, C Names, TXT and SRV records at your registrar or DNS host and point them where Microsoft says to point them
    • Balls of Steel Option: Put your Lab VM in your DMZ, harden it up, point the registrar at it and host your own DNS via Windows baby. Probably not advisable from a residential internet connection.
  • Keep your .onmicrosoft.com account for a week or two: Whether you’re starting out in O365 at work or just to learn the system like I did, you’ll need your first O365 account for a few days as the domain name porting process is a 24-36 hour process. Don’t assign your E1 licenses to your @domain.com account just yet.
  • I wouldn’t engage MFA just yet…let things settle before you turn on Multifactor authentication. Also be sure your backup email account (The oh shit account Microsoft wants you to use that’s not associated with O365) is accessible and secure.
  • Fresh start cause I couldn't build out an Exchange lab :sadface:
    Fresh start cause I couldn’t build out an Exchange lab :sadface:

    If you are simulating Exchange on-prem to hybrid for this exercise, you’ll have more steps than I did. Sadly, I had to give O365 the easy way out and selected “Fresh Start” in the process.

  • Proceed with the standard O365 wizard setups, but halt at OnRamp: I’m happy to see the Wizard configuration method is surviving in the cloud. Setting all this up won’t take long; the whole portal is pretty easy & obvious until you get to Sharepoint stuff.

Total work here is a couple of hours. I can’t stress how important your lab DNS & AD health are. You need to be rock solid in replication between your DCs, your DNS should be fast & reliably return accurate results, and you should have a good handle on your lab replication topology, a proper Sites & Services setup, and dial in your Group Policy and OU structure.

Daisetta Labs.net looks like this:

daisettalabsad

 

and dcdiag /e & repadmin show no errors.

Final Steps before DirSync Blastoff

  • With a healthy Domain on-prem, you need now to create some A Records, C-Names and TXT records so Lync, Outlook, and all your other fat clients dependent Exchange, Sharepoint and such know where to go. This is quite important; at work, you’ll run into this exact same situation.  Getting this right is why we chose to use routable domain, it’s a big chunk of the reason why we’re doing this whole Cloud Praxis thing in the first place. It’s so our users have an enjoyable and hassle-free transition to O365
  • Follow the directions here. Not as hard as it sounds. For me it went very smoothly. In fact, the O365 Enterprise portal gives you everything you need in the Domain panel, provided you’ve waited about 36 hours after porting your domain. Here’s what mine looks like on-prem after manually creating the records.

dns

And that’s it. We’re ready to Sync our Dirs to O365s Dirs, to get a little closer to #InfrastructureGlory. On one side: your on-prem AD stack, on the launch pad, in your lab ready for liftoff.

Sure, it’s a little hair-brained, admittedly, but if you’re like me, this is how you learn. And I’m learning. Aren’t you?

On the other launch pad, Office 365. Superbly architected by some Microsoft engineers, no longer joke-worthy like it was in the BPOS days, a place your infrastructure is heading to whether you like it or not.

I want you to be there ahead of all the other guys, and that’s what Cloud Praxis is all about: staying sharp on this cloud stack so we can keep our jobs and find #InfrastructureGlory.

DirSync is the first step here, and I’ll show you it on the next Cloud Praxis. Thanks for reading!

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