“Assume Breach” not just at work, but at home too

Security has been on my mind lately. I think that in the Spring of 2015, we’re in a new landscape regarding security, one that is much more sinister, serious and threatening than it was in years past. I used to think anonymity was enough, that there was saftey in the herd. But the rules & landscape have changed, and it’s different now than it was just 12 or 24 months ago. So, let’s do an exercise, let’s suppose for the sake of this post that the following are true:

  • Your credit history and your identity are objects in the marketplace that have value and thus are bought and sold between certain agents freely
  • These things are also true of your spouse or significant other’s credit history & identity, and even your child’s
  • Because these things are true, they are also true for malefactors (literally, bad actors) just like any other object that has value and can be traded
  • There is no legal structure in America aside from power of attorney that allows a single member of a family to protect the identity and credit history of another member of his/her family.
  • The same market forces that create innovation in enterprise technology are now increasing the potency of weaponized malware systems, that is to say that financial success attracts talent which begets better results which begets more financial success.
  • The engineers who build malware are probably better than you are at defending against them, and what’s more,they are largely beyond the reach of local, state, or national law enforcement agencies. ((Supposing that your local Sheriff’s Department even has the in-house know-how to handle security breaches, they lack jurisdiction in Ukraine))
  • The data breaches and mass identity theft of 2014 & 2015 are similar somehwat to a classic market failure, but no cure for this will be forthcoming from Washington, and the trial attorneys & courts who usually play a role in correcting market failures have determined your identity & credit history are worth about $0.14 (($10 million settlement for the 70 million victims of Target breach = $0.14))
  • Generally speaking most IT departments are bad and suffer from poor leadership, poorly-motivated staff, conflicting directions from the business, an inability to meet the business’ demands, or lack of C-level support. IT is Broken, in other words
  • All of this means it’s open season on you and your family’s identity & credit history, which we have to assume rest unencrypted on unpatched SQL servers behind an ASA with a list of unmitigated CVEs maintained by some guys in an IT department who hate their job
Don't be like these people. Secure your online identity now
Don’t be like these people. Secure your online identity now

There it is. That’s the state of personal identity & credit security in 2015 in America, in my view.

And worst of all, it’s not going to get better as every company in America with your data has done the math from the Target settlement and the beancounters have realized one thing: it’s cheaper to settle than to secure your information.

Assume breach at home

If this is truly the state of play -and I think it is- then you as an interested father/mother husband/wife need to take action. I suggest an approach in which you:

  1.  Own your Identity online by taking SMTP back: Your SMTP address is to the online world what your birth certificate and/or social security number is to the meatspace world: everything. Your SMTP address is the de facto unique identifier for you online ((By virtue of the fact that these two things are true of SMTP but are not true of rival identity systems, like Facebook or Google profiles: 1) Your SMTP address is required to transact business or utilize services online or is required at some point in a chain of identity systems and 2) SMTP is accepted by all systems and services as prima facie evidence of your identity because of its uniqueness & global acceptance and rival systems are not)) , which begs the question: why are you still using some hippy-dippy free email account you signed up for in college, and why are you letting disinterested third party companies host & mine something for free that is so vital to your identity? Own your identity and your personal security by owning and manipulating SMTP like corporations do: buy a domain, find a hosting service you like, and pay them to host your email. It doesn’t cost much, and besides, you should pay for that which you value. And owning your email has value in abundance: with your own domain, you can make alias SMTP addresses for each of the following things: social media, financial, shopping, food, bills, bulk and direct your accounts to them as appropriate. This works especially well in a family context, where you can point various monthly recurring accounts at a single SMTP address that you can redistribute via other methods and burn/kill as needed. ((Pretty soon, you and your loved ones will get the hang of it, and you and your family will be handing out food@domain.com to the grocery store checkout person, retail@domain.com for receipts, shopping@domain.com for the ‘etailers’ and apple@domain.com for the two iPhones & three other Apple devices you own.))
  2. Proxy your financial accounts wherever possible: Mask your finances behind a useful proxy, like Paypal, perhaps even Mint. The idea here is to put a buffer between your financial accounts and the services, people, and corporations that want access to them and probably don’t give two shits about protecting your identity or vetting their own IT systems properly. Whenever possible, I buy things online/pay people/services via Paypal or other tools so that use of my real accounts is minimized. Paypal even offers a business credit card backed by the Visa logo, which means you can use it in brick ‘n mortar stores like Target, where the infosec is as fast and loose as the sales and food quality.
  3. Filter the net at home and wherever else you can: Spyware, malware and viruses used to be an annoyance, the result of a global dick-measuring contest for geeks and nerds who liked to tinker and brag. But no more; today’s malware systems are weaponized and potent, and that puts you and your family at a huge disadvantage as it’s difficult to secure all the devices creeping into your life, let alone worry about the bad IT departments stewarding your sosh, DOB, mother’s maiden name and home address at RetailCo. I suggest a heavy filtering strategy by whatever means you can employ: employ whitelist javascript filtering on Windows PCs, use and pay for OpenDNS malware filtering, or buy something like ITUS Networks or even a ZyXel like the one I have. Get to know Privoxy well as I think filtering ads from websites is even fair now as the major ad agencies apparently can’t prevent malware from creeping into them. Finally invest some time and study into certificates and periodically review their use, as there are Certificate Authorities out there that you should not trust.
  4. Use Burner Numbers: Similar to SMTP, your standard US 10 digit POTS/Mobile phone is a kind of unique identifier to companies, existing somewhere in a unsecured table no doubt. Use burners where you can as your 10 digit mobile is important as  a unique identifier and an off-net secondary notification/authentication channel.  If Google Voice is to be killed off, as it appears to be, consider Ooma, where for $100/year, you can spawn burner numbers and use them in the same way you use SMTP. Else, use the app on your phone for quick burner numbers.
  5. Consider Power of Attorney or Incorporation: This is admittedly a little crazy, but words can’t describe how furious you’ll be when a family member’s identity has been stolen and some scummy organization that calls itself a bank is calling to verify that you’ve purchased $1000 in Old Navy gift certificates in Texas -something completely out-of-sync with your credit history- but they refuse to stop the theft because it’s happening to your wife, not you, and your wife can’t come to the phone right now.  The solution to this problem is beyond me, but probably involves a “You can’t beat ’em, join ’em” approach coupled with an attorney’s threatening letter.
  6. Learn to Love Sandboxing: Microsoft has a free and incredibly powerful tool called Enhanced Mitigation Experience Tool, or EMET, which allows you to select applications and essentially sandbox them so that they can’t pwn your entire operating system. Learn to use and love it. But the idea here goes beyond Win32 to the heart of what we should be doing as IT Pros: standing-up and tearing-down instances of environments, whether those environments are Docker containers, Windows VMs, jails in BSD, or KVM virtual machines. Such techniques are useful beyond devops, they are also useful as operational security techniques at home in my view.
  7. Go with local rather than national financial institutions: Where possible, consider joining a local credit union, where infosec practices might not be state of the art, but your family’s finances have more influence and weight than they do at a Bank of America.

I am not a security expert, but that’s how I see it. If we IT pros are to assume breach at work, as many experts advise us to, we should assume breach at home too, where our identities and those of our loved ones are even more vulnerable and even more valuable.

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