Using Powershell and IPInfo.io to Ease the Burden of WAN management

Imagine for a moment that you are an IT Professional charged with the care, feeding, and security of a classic Wide Area Network (WAN). Further, assume that, like any properly-designed WAN, your remote networks (whether MPLS or classic Hub-spoke) egress their internet connections directly, that is to say, internet traffic from remote networks isn’t back-hauled to your datacenter or HQ.

In such a scenario, you will need to have a list of each remote network’s public IP address and other pertinent details in order to manage routing and security at each branch. In my case, I needed up-to-date public IP address information in order to properly segment & report on internet traffic traversing our SSL/TLS proxy inspection service, Zscaler.

So how would you do this? An earlier version of myself, say 15 years ago, would respond this way:

I’d remote desktop to a node in each remote network, open up a browser window, and visit IPChicken.com. Then I’d carefully copy/paste the IP address details into my Excel document, and happy days! – Jeff, 15 years ago

Wrong answer, Jeff from 15 years ago! That’s bad practice, takes way too much time, involves using the cursed mouse, and is fraught with security risk because it involves browser use.

Fortunately, there is a much better, simpler, faster and more secure way to do this. Even better, it involves my favorite tool in the world, Powershell, as well as IPInfo.io, a web service that blows IPChicken.com out of the water.

Best of all, you can do it all without your hands ever leaving your keyboard. Check it out

Let’s use Powershell’s invoke-webrequest cmdlet to see what IPInfo.io returns to us:

Nice! As you can see, IPInfo.io returns to us an HTTP content-type of application/json, which stands for JavaScript Object Notation.

JSON, if you’re not familiar with it, is an open standard that has superseded-in practice- XML and other structured document standards. It’s in widespread use across the internet, and it’s really great for us Windows admins that IPINfo.io feeds us a JSON response to our query. Why?

Because we’ve got Powershell to make it look pretty for us! We just need to pipe the results of the invoke-webrequest command into the handy convertfrom-json cmdlet. Voila!

This is great, now I’ve got high-quality IP Information on my workstation. So how do I scale this out to my remote WAN networks? how do I get the public IP address of my Lake Winnepesaukee branch office using Powershell?

Assuming you’ve got a Windows domain and have configured Windows Remote Management in a secure fashion, the way to do this is simple. Let’s use Powershell to tell a WIndows node at each branch to fetch us the public IP address it’s sitting behind, format it in a pretty way, and bring it back to my beautiful blue console. In fact, let’s do all the branches at once by using invoke-command:

Boom! That’s how we do it in 2017! It took less than 20 seconds to invoke our simple invoke-webrequest + convertfrom-json command across five remote hosts. No remote desktop needed….all of it done securely via secure WinRM which I’ve set up my nodes to listen for.

With these results in your console, it’d be trivially easy to dump out each WAN’s public IP information into a CSV, or, even better, create a new Excel spreadsheet using new-comobject and save/send the information from there.