SSL

Fellow #VFD3 Delegate and Chicago-area vExpert Eric Shanks has recently posted two great pieces on how to setup an Active Directory Certificate Authority in your home lab environment.

Say what? Why would you want the pain of standing up some certificate & security infrastructure in your home lab?

Eric explains:

Home Lab SSL Certificates aren’t exactly a high priority for most people, but they are something you might want to play with before you get into a production environment.

Exactly.

Security & Certificate infrastructure are a weak spot in my portfolio so I’ve been practicing/learning in the Daisetta Lab so that I don’t fail at work. Here’s how:

As I was building out my lab, I knew three things: I wanted a routable Fully Qualified Domain Name for my home lab, I was focused on virtualization but should also practice for the cloud and things like ADFS, and I wanted my lab to be as secure as possible (death to port 80 & NTLM!)

With those loose goals in mind, I decided I wanted Daisetta Labs.net to be legit. To have some Certificate Authority bonafides…to get some respect in the strangely federated yet authoritarian world of certificate authorities, browser and OS certificate revocations, and yellow Chrome browser warning screens.

dlabs

Too legit, too legit to quit

So I purchased a real wildcard SSL certificate from a real Certificate Authority back in March. It cost about $96 for one year, and I don’t regret it at all because I’m using it now to secure all manner of things in Active Directory, and I’ll soon be using it as Daisetta Labs.net on-prem begins interfacing with DaisettaLabs.net in Azure (it already is, via Office 365 DirSync, but I need to get to the next level and the clock is ticking on the cert).

Building on Eric’s excellent posts, I suggest to any Microsoft-focused IT Pros that you consider doing what I did. I know it sucks to shell out money for an SSL certificate, but labwork is hard so that work-work isn’t so hard.

So, go follow Eric’s outline, buy a cert, wildcard or otherwise (got mine at Comodo, there’s also an Israeli CA that gives SSL certs for free, but it’s a drawn-out process) and stand up a subordinate CA (as opposed to a on-prem only Root CA) and get your 443 on!

Man it sucks to get something so fundamentally wrong. Reader Chris pointed out a few inaccuracies and mistakes about my post in the comments below.

At first I was indignant, then thoughtful & reflective, and finally resigned. He’s right. I built an AD Root -not a subortinate as that’s absurd- Certificate Authority in the lab.

Admittedly, I’m not strong in this area. Thanks to Chris for his coaching and I regret if I mislead anyone.